Have you decided to incorporate more physical activity into your life? Do you find yourself fighting an internal battle about whether you’re going to train today, or not? We’ve all been there. Or at least I can say openly and honestly I have, and continue to talk myself through at times.

There are days where I feel on top of the world, my day is centered around training and it’s the first thing I think about when I wake up. By the time I get to the gym I’m already in the zone, my endorphins are high and I’m focused on nothing but my workout.

Then there are the days where I have to drag myself out of bed, and contemplate all of the reasons why I shouldn’t, can’t or don’t have to train today. On these days, almost any excuse seems validated.

The truth is, that training is hard work, and committing yourself to a training program while changing eating habits, sleeping patterns and every day thoughts and behaviors, isn’t easy.

Making the decision to take charge in your life and create positive changes is a daily practice.

Daily

Adjective

  1. Occurring every day, or every week day.

Practice

Noun

  1. The actual application of something which is performed habitually and repeatedly, in order to acquire skill and proficiency.

 

Making changes in your body requires time, effort and energy. It’s not something that will happen overnight, there is no magic pill that will provide short term results that are sustainable for the long term.

After reflecting on my own experiences and connecting with friends and members about the excuses they use around training, the reoccurring themes were: lack of time, motivation, confidence, energy, knowledge, as well as lifestyle factors and work and home stresses.

So what are some of the ways we can overcome these excuses and hold ourselves accountable when we say we are going to train? By setting clear and defined Intentions and Priorities.

Begin by asking yourself, “What are my intentions, what do I want to achieve?

What are my priorities, what is most important to me?”

Once you have established what you are working towards and why, the easier it becomes to implement and stick to a training routine, without allowing your excuses to stop you.

“If not now, when?”

 

Paige Hewetson

Leave a Reply